LOVE what you cook & Cook what you LOVE!

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This weeks advice to you would be; to LOVE!
Love what you cook, and cook what you love! 
If this is not applied in the kitchen, then it will show in your food. The flavours will not bond and turn into beautiful harmony. 

The way I get into the spirit of cooking is;
1- Find a recipe I  would like to cook.
2- Go shopping and find all the ingredients.
3- Play some music you love listening to help get you in the mood. 
4- Set up the kitchen so everything is at hand.
5- Make sure you have plenty of space to cook.
6- Give yourself TIME, so you’re not rushed.
7- Listen to your instincts.
8- LOVE the recipe your cooking, LOVE the ingredients, LOVE who you’re cooking for, and have fun.

 

Mum of two becomes ‘the best and loyal customer of Priya’s Kitchen!

Picture of Anna Walters   Photo Credit to Jodie Humphries

Priya’s Kitchen was founded in February 2018, and since then regular and new customers come through the door to taste the delicious fresh food that gets cooked and served from Priya’s Kitchen. However, you always have your best customers that can’t live without Priya’s spicy food!! The reason why people come through the door is because it is HOME-COOKED, FRESH, AUTHENTIC and bold with flavours. Some of the other the dishes that are not familiar to the western palette gets cooked in the kitchen, which is not seen in your regular takeout joints or restaurants. These are dishes that have been cooked in traditional Indian homes for centuries.

Throughout the year, I have seen in my books that ‘Anna Walters’ has ordered numerous times, not saying that she isn’t great in her own kitchen because she’s a fantastic cook herself and cooks endlessly for her family. However, Priya’s takeaways are the best way to look after yourself when you have a busy life with the kids!

So, I decided to award and recognise my customer, who LOVES Priya’s Kitchen. And that is ‘the beautiful Anna Walters!’ I wanted to interview her and get to know her better.

 

So here she is; Mrs Anna Walters!

Q: Please introduce yourself;

A: My name is Anna Walters and I live in the St Marks area of Maidenhead. I’m a mum of two and an artist www.annawaltersart.com    

Q: What types of food do you love?

A: I love to eat and like a wide range of foods. Favourites if I had to pick are probably Japanese & Italian.   

Q: Why do you enjoy buying from Priya’s Kitchen? & Why do you like my food?

A: Priya’s food is absolutely delicious. So full of flavour, fresh and so much healthier than any other Indian take-out. It’s become a Friday night treat when I’m tired and bored of cooking for my tribe every other day of the week.       

Q: What is your favourite takeaway from Priya’s Kitchen?

A:  Maharashtra Dumpling Curry in an Onion and coconut sauce.

Q: What’s your favourite food shop?

A: The Italian Shop on Denmark Street in Maidenhead.  

Q: What’s your food tip or hint?

A: I use buckwheat flour in my kid’s pancakes (they have no idea!). We also grow herbs and fruit & veg in the garden which the kids love. They eat cherry tomatoes like sweets when in season.     

Q: Would you recommend any of my services?

A: I can’t recommend Priya’s homemade food enough. The weekly take-out is just so good. The masala paste is also a great way to make-your-own at home. We made boxing day turkey curry with ours which was a massive hit.

 

Anna Walters is a wonderful Artist, she graduated and started her career in advertising, and like many women like myself have now changed their careers to look after their children. However, we all need to work and keep our sanity above board before we literally go stir crazy! So, I would love you to check out Anna’s webpage www.annawaltersart.com  as she has taken on her new profession as an Artist! She works with oil paints and only works on commission and believes that art should be affordable so is very reasonably priced.

 

Here are a few of my favourites!! 

As Anna, has been the best customer, she will be given a free family meal on the house!

 Thank you, Anna, for supporting a small business like myself and for apricating my heritage!

 

 

 

 

Engaging your senses!

 

Do you use your 5 senses when you eat? Sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch?

We should take the opportunity to stop, breathe and celebrate. We  forget how easy it is to get caught up in our everyday life and rush food down our mouths, eating mindlessly. Who sits down and looks at the food in detail and savours the aroma? If you pause to eat more mindfully, you will taste every spice, ingredient, texture and flavour.  We forget to glorify the little things that make our lives rich on a day-to-day basis, to celebrate the food we have in our hands.

Food can evoke negative emotions and positive emotions. When we are feeling negative and disconnected in the world, this is when over-eating plays a part a big part in our lives. However, when you are positive and full of life, this is when you enjoy the burst of flavours and feel the sensation of spice inside your mouth. You can change your relationship with food, and it starts with appreciation and choosing to be present. Slow down and engage all of your senses the next time you shop, cook or eat a meal, and the result will be a transcendent, extraordinary experience!

The first step in engaging your senses is taking time to experience the moment. Once you find the space to breathe and be present, you’ll be amazed at the joy your food has to offer you. When you engage all your senses, the brain releases feel-good chemicals, which elevate your mood and evoke feelings of trust, enjoyment and relaxation. The result is that you’ll enjoy your food in a new and exciting way.

Take in what you see. “We eat with our eyes first,” yet we rarely take the time to truly experience this. What you see will likely evoke emotion, and you may even associate what you see with flavours your love or hate. This is a great time to consider where your food came from and how it was grown, and if you’re eating a meal, you can reflect on the work that went into preparing it. Appreciating the beauty of food and its journey to your plate.

Touch, feel & smell. Do you feel your food? Even with your tongue? You smell your food before you eat it? Ever really paused to think about the sensuality of the experience? Explore the texture and immerse yourself in the tactile sensations you experience in the kitchen, from holding a knife to peeling garlic, chopping an onion or juicing a lemon. Get your hands dirty and play with your food, then slow down enough to really enjoy the experience. As you eat, think about the way a food feels in your mouth, which will, in turn, slow down your eating and engage you in the flavour of the meal.

Listen to, while you savour each bite. Challenge yourself to take a bite and taste your food before you even started chewing it. Chew mindfully; challenge yourself to chew your food at least 10 times and pay attention to each chomp and the way the flavour and texture of your food changes. By savouring each bite, you can enjoy less food – and still, feel satisfied.

Relish the aroma. There’s something so inviting about the smell of your home when you cook, as well as the aromas at your favourite restaurant. Scents evoke memories and emotions, which you can use to your advantage. How a food smells is directly related to your perception of how that food tastes.  Seasoning your food with beautifully fragrant herbs and spices can enhance the aroma and, therefore, taste. Take a moment before each bite to inhale and enjoy the way your food smells, which in turn gets you excited to mindfully eat it.

The soundtrack to your life. Though our sense of hearing seems abstract to our relationship with food, it isn’t. When you take an active approach to listen to the world around you, it can deepen your overall experience of life, including your relationship with food. Listen to the sounds created when you cut into a potato, or the sizzle as you sauté some vegetables in a pan. Be attentive to the sound of chewing your food, and delight in the melody of voices as you share a healthy meal with friends and family.

You may give this a go once in a while or incorporate a few of these tips on a daily basis, but either way, the act of engaging yourself in all that your food is offering will allow you to celebrate your plate in a way that takes the emphasis off deprivation.

Meet Davinder Ojalla – The Lightworker Coach, she’s a dear friend of mine and I would like to share her blog with you to help with this exercise. It’s so simple but yet effective and it’s called ‘The Raisin Exercise – Mindfulness Meditation’

Davinder’s Raisin Exercise can help us ignite a healthy love for food. This exercise is a great way to help with diets and health and it’s an holistic approach to our personal evolution and potential. Next time you eat one of my dishes or cook one of my recipes, I would love you to use your 5 senses and engage with the food. Tell me about the journey you’ve experienced!

 

 

Fruit & Veg of the Month – February

 

 Heath Benefits of White Cabbage

  1. Cabbage is a low-calorie vegetable that is rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.
  2. Cabbage contains powerful antioxidants that may help reduce inflammation.
  3. Your body needs vitamin C for many important functions, and it is a potent anti-oxidant. Red cabbage is particularly high in this nutrient, providing about 85% of the RDI per cup (89 grams).
  4. Cabbage contains insoluble fibre, which keeps the digestive system healthy by providing fuel for friendly bacteria and promoting regular bowel movements.
  5. Cabbage contains powerful pigments called anthocyanins, which have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease.
  6. Potassium helps keep blood pressure within a healthy range. Increasing your intake of potassium-rich foods like cabbage may help lower high blood pressure levels.
  7. Cabbage is a good source of soluble fibre and plant sterols. These substances have been shown to reduce LDL cholesterol.
  8. Vitamin K is critical for blood clotting. Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin K1, with 85% of the RDI in 1 cup (89 grams).
  9. Cabbage is a versatile veggie that’s easy to incorporate into your diet. You can use it to make many different dishes, including salads, stews, soups, slaws and sauerkraut.
  10. Cabbage contains calcium, potassium, and magnesium, which all are necessary for bone health.

The Bottom Line:

Cabbage is an exceptionally healthy food. It has an outstanding nutrient profile and is especially high in vitamins C and K. In addition, eating cabbage may even help lower the risk of certain diseases, improve digestion and combat inflammation. Plus, cabbage makes a tasty and inexpensive addition to a number of recipes. With so many potential health benefits, it is easy to see why cabbage deserves some time in the spotlight and some room on your plate.

Vegan-Friendly Coriander Chutney Recipe

This dip is bursting with fresh, vibrant flavours guaranteed to satisfy all your dinner guests. With a list of ingredients that conforms to the strictest vegan diet, this coriander dip (or chutney) does not suffer at all from being dairy-free. In fact, this is one of my favourite dips or sauces, and I love to serve it up with anything from onion bahjis to daals and dosa. The delightfully deep green colour is a treat for the eyes as much as the stomach and is a low-fat alternative to other high calorie dips containing yoghurt or loads of sugar.

Ingredients:

Fresh coriander – lots and lots of it! (If you by coriander from Asian shops then use 1 bunch or if you buy from a supermarket use 10 packets)
1 heaped tsp chopped garlic
1 heaped tsp green birds eye chilli
The juice of one whole lemon
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
1 squeeze of tomato ketchup
½ tsp jeera powder (or ground cumin)

Method:
Roughly chop the coriander and pop it in the blender/food processor and blitz
Add in all the other ingredients and give it another blitz
Taste it now and adjust it to your liking, whether you’d like it saltier, more tart or sweeter.

Serve it up with your favourite Indian snack or meal!